Alumni Mentoring Network

The world of science is vast and our trainees can look forward to careers in a variety of sectors.  As career choices are formulated, it is important to have networking opportunities, to be able to connect with those actually working in potential fields of interest.  Having a variety of career experiences in academia, industry, teaching, policy, law, writing/editing and administration, our GMS alumni can provide valuable advice and connections to inform career opportunities for our students and post-doctoral fellows. Below is a short synopsis of the work and contact information for each alumnus who has agreed to serve as a mentor to our trainees as they consider future career moves.  Trainees should feel free to contact anyone on the list to get additional information/advice about the work itself as well as the path to the job.

Academia, Industry, Government, Administration, Intellectual Property and Research Compliance, Other

Academia

Chris Andry, MPhil, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, BUSM
Family Medicine, BUSM
andryc@bu.edu

I serve as the Vice Chair for Operations and Management, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, BUSM and as the Executive Director for Cancer Care Services, Boston Medical Center.  I’m also a member of the Department of Family Medicine faculty. I’m the co-director of the graduate studies program in pathology. My primary roles and responsibilities are administrative in the cancer care center and pathology department. I am the PI on a contract with the NCI for biospecimen banking and am interested in the science of pre-analytic variables for specimen archiving.  I am also participating in a study on shared decision making on prostate health, with particular attention being paid to the African-American community.  I have a passion to contribute in any way I can to reduce healthcare disparities, particular for cancer patients and people with disabilities.  I’m a BU alum and would be glad to mentor students who have an interest in Biomedicine and the Healthcare Industry.

Clint Baldwin, Ph.D.
cbaldwin@bu.edu

I received my Ph.D. in the Biochemistry Department at BUSM in 1986 and began a research career aimed at understanding the molecular and genetic basis of human disease.  In 1991, I returned to BUSM as a faculty member where I continued and expanded this line of research.

Current projects in the lab include the genetic study of Alzheimer Disease, psychiatric disorders and sickle cell disease.  We continually embrace new technologies including whole genome sequencing as well as the use of induced pleuripotent stem cells as in vitro models of genetic disease.

Alexei Degterev, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Biochemistry
Tufts University
Alexei.Degterev@tufts.edu

Dr. Alexei Degterev received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1998 from the Division of Graduate Sciences at Boston University School of Medicine. Following post-doctoral training at the Department of Cell Biology at Harvard Medical School, he became an Assistant Professor at Tufts University in 2006. My lab focuses on the analysis of the mechanisms of apoptotic and necrotic cell death and on the development of small molecule modulators of these processes.

Kelly S. Giovanello, Ph.D.
kgio@unc.edu

Currently,  a tenured Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology and Biomedical Research Imaging Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Research synopsis: My research combines behavioral, patient-based, and functional neuroimaging approaches to investigate the cognitive neuroscience of human learning and memory. My primary research focus is in elucidating the cognitive processes and neural mechanisms mediating relational memory - the form of memory which represents relationships among items or informational elements. In everyday life, relational memory processes play a critical role in linking or binding together the various cognitive, affective, and contextual components of a learning event into an integrated memory trace. Research studies in my lab investigate the cognitive and neural processes mediating relational memory in young adults and examining how these processes change with healthy aging and neurodegenerative disease (particularly Alzheimer’s disease).

Kyriakos E. Kypreos, Ph.D.
Associate Professor in Pharmacology
University of Patras Medical School
Department of Medicine
kkypreos@med.upatras.gr

Dr Kyriakos Kypreos received his Ph.D. in Biochemistry in 1998 from the Division of Graduate Sciences at Boston University School of Medicine. Following post-doctoral training in the U.S.A and the Netherlands, in 2004 he became Research Instructor and in 2006 Research Assistant Professor in Medicine at Boston University. From 2008 till present, he serves as Associate Professor in Pharmacology at The University of Patras Medical School in Greece. Dr. Kypreos is an EMBO Fellow, a Marie-Curie Fellow, and the winner of the 2002 “Irvine H. Page” Research Award by the American Heart Association.

Ellen Townes-Anderson, Ph.D.
Professor
Department of Neurology and Neurosciences
New Jersey Medical School-UMDNJ
andersel@umdnj.edu

Dr. Ellen Towns-Anderson is the director of the Junior Faculty Mentoring Program at New Jersey Medical School, runs the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs, maintains an active NIH funded laboratory, and teaches medical and graduate students.

My current research is on the eye, specifically diseases of the retina. We are working on injury-induced changes in synaptic connections. It is well recognized that the brain is plastic and its neural connectivity can change under a variety of conditions. The retina can too. We are trying to control that plasticity to be able to use it when it may promote regeneration and healing after injury and retinal degenerative disease.

Steve Treon, M.D., Ph.D.
Steven_treon@dfci.harvard.edu

Dr. Steven Treon is the Director of the Bing Center for Waldenström’s Research and an attending physician for medical oncology, at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, in Boston, Massachusetts. He is also an Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School in Boston, and is the Chair of the Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia Clinical Trials Group.

After earning a doctorate in tumor immunology from Boston University (BU), Dr Treon did a postgraduate fellowship in the Department of Microbiology at BU School of Medicine. Dr Treon received a medical degree from BU School of Medicine and completed an internship in medicine and a residency in internal medicine at BU Medical Center. Dr Treon also served a clinical fellowship in hematology and oncology at Mass General Hospital and a research fellowship at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School. He received certification from the American Board of Internal Medicine in 1995, and in medical oncology in 1997.

Dr Treon’s main research interests focus on understanding the genetic basis and pathogenesis of Waldenström’s macroglobulinemia and the development of therapeutics for this malignancy. He serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Blood, Clinical Cancer Research, and The Lancet. Dr Treon is a member of several professional societies including the American Medical Association, American Society of Hematology, American Society of Clinical Oncology, European Society of Hematology and the Massachusetts Medical Society. He has been honored with several research and academic awards from various national and international medical foundations and institutes, including the Robert A. Kyle Award for Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia.

Peter Williamson, Ph.D.
Peter.williamson2@nih.gov

Our laboratory focuses on host-pathogen relationships in disseminated fungal infections. Fungal infections have become increasingly important coincident with the rise of populations that are immunosuppressed from cancer chemotherapy, transplant conditioning or HIV/AIDS. For example, infections by Cryptococcus neoformans currently accounts for about 600,000 deaths annually, rivaling infections such as tuberculosis world-wide. As a translational laboratory, we conduct a range of basic science projects seeking to identify key aspects of host immunology and pathogen virulence and then to use this knowledge in the identification of novel approaches to treatment and prevention. At the intramural research program of the National Institutes of Health, we have a unique opportunity to follow cohorts of patients with unusual fungal infections from across the US to study genetic and immunological defects responsible for their susceptibility to disease and to test novel therapies designed in our laboratory.

Website: http://www.niaid.nih.gov/labsandresources/labs/aboutlabs/lcid/translationalmycology/Pages/default.aspx

Dezheng Zhao, Ph.D.
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School.
dzhao@bidmc.harvard.edu

After I got my Ph.D. in 2000 from Department of Biochemistry, BU, I started my postdoctoral fellow training at Division of Gastroenterology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School. In 2002, I was promoted to Instructor in Medicine at Harvard Medical School. In 2007 I was promoted to Assistant Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School. My research is to investigate the expression and role of novel genes in inflammation and cancer using molecular/cell biology techniques, animal models and genetically modified mice.

Industry

Larry Cosenza, PhD.
Founder & Chief Science Manager
lcosenza@c2biotechnologies.com
www.c2biotechnologies.com

Dr. Cosenza is the Founder and Chief Science Manager for C2 Biotechnologies, LLC (Germantown, New York).  Drawing from his background in protein engineering, structural and computational biology Dr. Cosenza has developed propriety algorithms to design and construct fusion enzymes for specific industrial process. He has received multiple SBIR grants and contracts with numerous publications and patent assignments.

John Dumas, Ph.D.
Senior Scientist, Shire HGT
jdumas@shire.com

John J. Dumas, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at Shire Human Genetic Therapies (HGT), a business unit of Shire plc. After earning a doctorate in Pharmacology from BUSM, Dr. Dumas completed postdoctoral training in academia and industry, focusing on protein production, X-ray crystallography, and high-resolution structure determination of protein complexes.  His first industry experience was at Genetics Institute/Wyeth Research (now Pfizer) in Cambridge, MA where he determined receptor-ligand co-structures of GpIb-thrombin, GpIb-VWF(A1), and IL13-IL13 receptor complexes.

Dr. Dumas is currently in the Biomolecular Research and Technologies group within Discovery Research at Shire HGT in Lexington, MA.  Shire HGT has leading-edge expertise in enzyme replacement therapy and a focus on discovering and developing new therapies for rare, life-threatening genetic disease.  Dr. Dumas and colleagues work in the initial development, analysis, and validation of candidate molecules for Proof of Concept studies with disease models, allowing us to develop a number of effective treatments for conditions caused by enzyme or protein deficiencies.

David Eyerman, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist, Alkermes Inc.
david.eyerman@alkermes.com

My primary role is PI of a microdialysis and neurochemistry lab aimed at determining the in-vivo neurochemical response of NCEs and reference compounds in brain areas of interest in rodent models. In addition, I am joint PI of in-vivo pain pharmacology and behavioral neuroscience programs supporting our discovery programs.  I am the lead pharmacologist on multiple project teams and sit on our discovery management review panel.  I have 5 direct reports, including two scientist level personnel and 3 research assistants. In this role I have mentored a post-doctoral fellow, who has recently assumed a new position as one of my scientist level reports.

Sarah Follows, Ph.D.
Clinical Trial Manager, Merrimack Pharmaceuticals
Sarah.follows@gmail.com

I am currently a Clinical Trial Manager at Merrimack Pharmaceuticals in Cambridge.  To summarize my role, I manage clinical operations activities for oncology trials (Phases 1-3) which include writing and/or reviewing clinical documents such as protocols, informed consent forms, and various other study documents. I am also responsible for managing timelines, vendor performance, internal metrics, and communication of trial status to ensure studies are completed according to company objectives. Within Merrimack, I also work as part of a multidisciplinary research and development team, with one objective amongst others, to develop companion diagnostics for the therapeutic candidates.

D.J. McCrann, Ph.D.
Research Scientist I
IDEXX Laboratories
djmccrann@gmail.com

Currently, I'm a research scientist I at IDEXX Laboratories in Westbrook, ME. I work as a technical lead on a core team for new product development. We develop veterinary diagnostics immunoassays for our in clinic instrument systems. My responsibilities are to develop the assay, manage a group of research associates on the assay team and to coordinate and communicate with the other groups involved in the project (engineering, software, commercial, pilot group, operations etc).

Thomas P. Richardson, Ph.D., M.B.A .
Director, Office of Research Alliances
thomrich@vpr.rutgers.edu

Dr. Richardson is the head of the Office of Research Alliances at Rutgers University where he focuses on partnering Rutgers faculty, centers and capabilities with industry collaborators. He was previously in the Business Development group at Medarex, Inc. where his primary focus was on target licensing and establishing various joint research collaborations and sponsored research programs in support of several drugs in the early-stage pipeline. Prior to joining Medarex, Dr. Richardson was a Principal Scientist in Drug Delivery at Momenta Pharmaceuticals in Cambridge, MA.  He joined shortly after the company’s founding and led a multi-disciplinary team developing glycomics-based, drug inhalation technologies. He was also part of the enoxaparin team leading to the first biogeneric drug to be approved by the FDA.  Dr. Richardson has over 20 publications and patents/applications in biochemistry, cell biology, materials science, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.  He received a BA in Chemistry/Biology from Boston University, a PhD in Biochemistry from Boston University School of Medicine and was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Michigan in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Sciences. He also holds an MBA from Rider University where he completed the final coursework started at Babson College.

Stephanie Seidl, Ph.D.
Product Scientist II, Cell Signaling Technologies
seseidl@gmail.com

After graduating from Cell and Molecular Biology- Biochemistry in 2011 I went straight into industry. I accepted a position as a Product Scientist II at Cell Signaling Technologies in Beverly, MA. I work as part of a team managing production and QC of over 1200 antibodies. Our responsibilities include production and validation of new antibody lots. We perform purifications of raw material along with Western and Immunoprecipitation for QC analysis. In addition to bench work, I am also responsible for phone and email tech support for our products. I communicate daily with scientists all over the world who are using our products and assist them in optimizing their protocol to get the best results possible.

Gregory Staples, Ph.D.
Research Scientist
gregory_staples@agilent.com

I am a research scientist in the molecular separations group within Agilent Laboratories at Agilent Technologies in Santa Clara, CA. Agilent Labs is a central research organization, and powers the growth of the company with breakthrough science and technology. Within Agilent Labs, I am responsible for developing new technologies and methodologies with a focus on glycomics and proteomics. Despite working in industry, my position is in many ways academic, as I attend/speak at conferences, publish, and collaborate with university and industry groups. I have been working at Agilent since 2010, immediately after receiving my Ph.D. from BU

Government

Sally H. Hu, Ph.D., M.B.A.
Commander, U.S. Public Health Service
Senior Licensing and Patenting Manager
Infectious Disease & Medical Engineering Group
National Institutes of Health
hus@mail.nih.gov

The NIH Office of Technology Transfer evaluates, protects, markets, licenses, monitors, and manages the wide range of NIH and FDA discoveries, inventions, and other intellectual property as mandated by the Federal Technology Transfer Act and related legislation. To accomplish its mission, OTT oversees patent prosecution and negotiates and monitors licensing agreements. OTT performs similar functions for patenting and licensing activities for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), another component of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Other major functions within OTT include the development of technology transfer policies for NIH and with the other two major research components of HHS (FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC]) and the implementation of decisions by the Technology Transfer Policy Board.

Peter Williamson, Ph.D.
Peter.williamson2@nih.gov

Our laboratory focuses on host-pathogen relationships in disseminated fungal infections. Fungal infections have become increasingly important coincident with the rise of populations that are immunosuppressed from cancer chemotherapy, transplant conditioning or HIV/AIDS. For example, infections by Cryptococcus neoformans currently accounts for about 600,000 deaths annually, rivaling infections such as tuberculosis world-wide. As a translational laboratory, we conduct a range of basic science projects seeking to identify key aspects of host immunology and pathogen virulence and then to use this knowledge in the identification of novel approaches to treatment and prevention. At the intramural research program of the National Institutes of Health, we have a unique opportunity to follow cohorts of patients with unusual fungal infections from across the US to study genetic and immunological defects responsible for their susceptibility to disease and to test novel therapies designed in our laboratory.

Website:

http://www.niaid.nih.gov/labsandresources/labs/aboutlabs/lcid/translationalmycology/Pages/default.aspx

Administration, Intellectual Property and Research Compliance

Chris Andry, MPhil, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, BUSM
Family Medicine, BUSM
andryc@bu.edu

I serve as the Vice Chair for Operations and Management, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, BUSM and as the Executive Director for Cancer Care Services, Boston Medical Center.  I’m also a member of the Department of Family Medicine faculty. I’m the co-director of the graduate studies program in pathology. My primary roles and responsibilities are administrative in the cancer care center and pathology department. I am the PI on a contract with the NCI for biospecimen banking and am interested in the science of pre-analytic variables for specimen archiving.  I am also participating in a study on shared decision making on prostate health, with particular attention being paid to the African-American community.  I have a passion to contribute in any way I can to reduce healthcare disparities, particular for cancer patients and people with disabilities.  I’m a BU alum and would be glad to mentor students who have an interest in Biomedicine and the Healthcare Industry.

Ellen Townes-Anderson, Ph.D.
Professor
Department of Neurology and Neurosciences
New Jersey Medical School-UMDNJ
andersel@umdnj.edu

I am director of the Junior Faculty Mentoring Program at New Jersey Medical School and can easily relate to your concerns. I also run the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs, maintain an active NIH funded laboratory, and teach medical and graduate students.

My current research is on the eye, specifically diseases of the retina. We are working on injury-induced changes in synaptic connections. It is well recognized that the brain is plastic and its neural connectivity can change under a variety of conditions. The retina can too. We are trying to control that plasticity to be able to use it when it may promote regeneration and healing after injury and retinal degenerative disease.

Thomas P. Richardson, Ph.D., M.B.A.
Director, Office of Research Alliances
thomrich@vpr.rutgers.edu

Dr. Richardson is the head of the Office of Research Alliances at Rutgers University where he focuses on partnering Rutgers faculty, centers and capabilities with industry collaborators. He was previously in the Business Development group at Medarex, Inc. where his primary focus was on target licensing and establishing various joint research collaborations and sponsored research programs in support of several drugs in the early-stage pipeline. Prior to joining Medarex, Dr. Richardson was a Principal Scientist in Drug Delivery at Momenta Pharmaceuticals in Cambridge, MA.  He joined shortly after the company’s founding and led a multi-disciplinary team developing glycomics-based, drug inhalation technologies. He was also part of the enoxaparin team leading to the first biogeneric drug to be approved by the FDA.  Dr. Richardson has over 20 publications and patents/applications in biochemistry, cell biology, materials science, drug delivery, and tissue engineering.  He received a BA in Chemistry/Biology from Boston University, a PhD in Biochemistry from Boston University School of Medicine and was a Post-Doctoral Fellow at the University of Michigan in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Sciences. He also holds an MBA from Rider University where he completed the final coursework started at Babson College.

Other