Turn On Encryption

Turning on the encryption that comes with Windows or Apple devices ensures that a theft does not turn into a breach.  Patients and research subjects rightly expect us to safeguard their health information.  And because encryption is generally free and does not impact computer processing, an unencrypted stolen device often leads to enforcement penalties: https://www.hhs.gov/about/news/2019/11/05/failure-to-encrypt-mobile-devices-leads-to-3-million-dollar-hipaa-settlement.htmlEncrypting Personal Desktops, Laptops, and Tablets

Encrypting Personal Phones

If you bought your phone in the last two years and passcodes or biometric scans are required to unlock it, then encryption is automatically turned on. If you brought your phone more than two years ago, then it is likely you have to manually turn on encryption.

Encrypting Personal Desktops, Laptops, and Tablets

1. Check to see if your personal device has encryption enabled.

  1. For Windows computers, it is called BitLocker.
  2. For Apple computers, it is called FileVault.


 

2. If your personal device does not have encryption enabled, then follow these steps.

  1. Windows
    1. BitLocker is ONLY available on the following editions of Windows:
      1. Windows 10 Pro
      2. Windows 10 Enterprise
      3. Windows 10 Education
    2. If you have Windows 10 Home, the minimum cost to upgrade is $99 USD to the Windows 10 Pro edition.
    3. Enable encryption by following these instructions here:
      1. https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4028713/windows-10-turn-on-device-encryption
  2. Apple
    1. FileVault 2 is ONLY available on the following editions of Mac OS:
      1. Mac OS X Lion (10.7) and later.
    2. It is free to upgrade your Mac operating system.
    3. Enable encryption by following these instructions here:
      1. https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204837