Category: Uncategorized

Researchers Find Promise in New Treatments for GBM

October 1st, 2014 in Uncategorized

Glioblastma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most lethal primary brain tumors, with median survival for these patients only slightly over one year. Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), in collaboration with researchers from the City of Hope, are looking toward novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of GBM in the form of targeted therapies against a unique receptor, the interleukin-13 receptor α chain variant 2 (IL13Rα2).

Neuonc_16_10_Cover_Neuonc_16_10_CoverIn a review paper published in the October issue of Neuro-Oncology, the researchers discuss various targeted therapies against IL13Rα2 and early successes of clinical trials with these therapies in the treatment of GBM. The paper also highlights the need for future trials to improve efficacy and toxicity profiles of targeted therapies in this field.

Targeted therapies, which are drugs that interfere with specific molecules involved in cancer growth, have been successfully used in the treatment of many cancers, including breast and blood cancers. Successful targets for therapies are specific to tumor cells and not found on normal cells. Selectively expressed on GBM and absent on surrounding brain tissue, the interleukin-13 receptor α chain variant 2 (IL13Rα2) was identified as a potential target for therapy for GBM two decades ago. IL13Rα2 also plays an important role in the growth of tumors. In normal physiologic conditions, IL-13 binds to the receptor IL13Rα1 and helps regulate immune responses. In cancer cells, IL-13 binds to the receptor IL13Rα2 and, through a series of steps, prevents cancer cells from undergoing normal cell death. Increased expression of IL13Rα2 promotes the progression of GBM.

Since its discovery, IL13Rα2 has provided a target for therapies in GBM. These therapies have ranged from fusion proteins of IL-13 and bacterial toxins, oncolytic viruses, and immunotherapies. A phase I clinical trial and a phase III clinical trial have been completed for a T-cell based immunotherapy and IL-13/ bacterial toxin fusion protein respectively, both with promising outcomes.

“The field of targeted therapies in gliomas holds a lot of promise, and IL13Rα2 is in an optimal position to materialize these promises,” explained corresponding author Sadhak Sengupta, PhD, assistant professor of neurosurgery at BUSM and principal investigator of the Brain Tumor Lab at Roger Williams. “While early trials are encouraging, we need further research to achieve better targeting of the receptor and improved safety profiles of the treatments.”

Funding for this research was provided by the Roger Williams Medical Center Brain Tumor Research Fund.

MED’s Corley Appointed NEIDL Director

September 23rd, 2014 in Uncategorized

Takes charge at critical moment in research into infectious diseases

One of Ronald Corley’s first tasks as NEIDL director will be to identify the top three areas to focus recruiting efforts on. Photo by Kalman Zabarsky

One of Ronald Corley’s first tasks as NEIDL director will be to identify the top three areas to focus recruiting efforts on. Photo by Kalman Zabarsky

Ronald Corley, whose five years as associate director of BU’s National Emerging Infectious Diseases Laboratories (NEIDL) saw the lab overcome several legal and political challenges, has been appointed NEIDL director, effective October 1. Corley will continue as a School of Medicine professor and chair of microbiology, but will no longer be Medical Campus associate provost for research.

Announcing Corley’s appointment in a message to the Boston University community, President Robert A. Brown describes the new director as “an outstanding scientist and a collaborative leader.”

Corley succeeds John R. Murphy, a MED professor of medicine and microbiology, who had been NEIDL interim director since 2011. Brown says he is grateful to Murphy, “who has been instrumental in bringing the laboratories through the arduous regulatory processes and the initial launch of operations.”

“Dr. Corley’s leadership and vision will allow the NEIDL to reach its potential of being one of the premier centers for research on emerging and deadly infectious diseases,” says Gloria S. Waters, vice president and associate provost for research. “His experience as the associate director over the past five years will ensure a smooth transition and has shown that he has the collaborative style necessary to run a center like this and strengthen this area of research excellence at BU.”

Corley takes the helm of NEIDL at a critical time, as the worst Ebola virus outbreak in history continues to sweep across Central Africa.

“With Ebola, you can’t diagnose somebody until they’re already symptomatic,” he says. “Think how beneficial it would be if you had a tool that could diagnose people earlier. That alone would be a game changer. It’s imperative for us to learn to understand these emerging viruses and also to develop the diagnostics, the therapeutics, and the vaccines. That’s what the NEIDL is about.”

Construction of the NEIDL, on the Medical Campus in Boston’s South End, was completed in 2008 at a cost of $200 million, with the majority of the funding—$141 million—provided by the National Institutes of Health. The 192,000-square-foot laboratory is part of a national network of secure facilities dedicated to the development of diagnostics, vaccines, and treatments to combat emerging and reemerging infectious diseases.

The NEIDL has faced opposition from community activists expressing concern over safety and security, worries heightened by recent breaches at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), where scientists were accidentally exposed to potentially viable anthrax bacteria.

“The recent events at the CDC have done nothing to dampen people’s concerns,” says Corley. “Those were horrible events—they were outrageous. The first thing we do when events like that happen is review all our processes and ask, could that have happened here? And if the answer is no, we make sure everyone understands why. And if we need to change something, we change it.”

Corley says he is committed to open communication with the public regarding the lab’s operations, safety protocols, and research goals.

“One of the things that former director Jack Murphy has been adamant about—and I have absolute, full intention to continue—is to be as open, direct, and transparent with the community as possible,” Corley says. “We want to address any questions that come our way and meet with anyone who wants to meet with us. We will continue our public outreach, because communication with the public is absolutely critical.”

The lab has been approved for some Biosafety Level 3 (BSL-3) research and is currently working to secure the necessary permits and approvals for BSL-4 research from the Boston Public Health Commission and the CDC. Corley’s goal is to begin BSL-4 research in the NEIDL in 2015. He also plans to begin a significant recruitment campaign across a number of different disciplines.

“We already have a small but outstanding group of scientists here,” he says. “What we want to do is build critical mass in certain areas that will raise everybody’s game.”

One of his first tasks will be to identify the top three areas to focus recruiting efforts on. These areas are still under discussion, but zoonosis (the spread of infectious disease between species) and pathogenesis (the mechanism by which microbes cause disease) will certainly be top priorities at NEIDL, he says. Tuberculosis and other respiratory pathogens are also likely areas of focus.

“The advantage of having the NEIDL in an academic, research-intensive institution is that it gives us the ability to address broad questions about infectious diseases,” he says. “That means we are going to be recruiting people from a variety of disciplines: engineers, chemists, biologists, ecologists. Emerging infectious diseases are about humans encroaching on animal territories, and it’s about global warming and changes in habitats. We’re not just doing research on individual pathogens and how they function, but also trying to globally understand where these diseases come from and how we can model, predict, and prevent their spread to humans.”

Corley earned a BS in zoology and a PhD in microbiology and immunology from Duke University. He has been MED’s microbiology chair since 1994, a position he says taught him to work across disciplines and build broad collaborations between the Charles River and Medical Campuses.

“We want to be a premier emerging infectious diseases institute, not only in the United States, but in the world,” he says. “And I think we have the potential for doing exactly that.”

This BU Today article was written by Barbara Moran

Christine Pace, MD, Selected One of Boston’s 2014 Outstanding Young Leaders

September 18th, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

Christine-PaceThe Greater Boston Chamber of Commerce recently announced its list of Boston’s 2014 10 Outstanding Young Leaders and it includes Dr. Christine Pace, BUSM assistant professor of Medicine and primary care physician at BMC. The list acknowledges the contributions of young leaders who come from the public, private, and nonprofit sectors of Greater Boston.

Pace, whose interests include improving care for people with behavioral health problems, leads an interdisciplinary team at BMC that integrates behavioral health services into care provided at the Adult Primary Care Clinic. In 2011, she co-founded a primary care clinic at the Boston Public Health Commission’s opioid treatment program, which was one of the first models of its kind in the state, where patients are screened for behavioral health conditions and offered on-site counseling and psychiatric care. Dr. Pace also serves as a consultant for the Bureau of Substance Abuse Services in the Massachusetts Department of Public Health.

 

 

Pharmacology Student to Receive Perdana Scholar Award from Malaysian Prime Minister

September 18th, 2014 in Uncategorized

 Joon Boon

Yvette Joon Ying Boon, a Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics doctoral student, has been selected to receive the Perdana Scholar Award by the Education Department of Malaysia for students studying in the United States. The goal of the program is to identify, document and promote Malaysian students who have excelled in areas including academics, leadership, sports, entrepreneurship, invention and research. The Prime Minister of Malaysia will present the award Sept. 26 in New York.

 A member of Phi Beta Kappa, Boon graduated from BU College of Arts and Sciences summa cum laude with distinction. She conducts her doctoral research in Dr. Benjamin Wolozin’s laboratory studying the post-transcriptional regulation of Alpha-Synuclein by Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase in Parkinson’s disease. 

 “Joon’s selection for this award is a tribute to her many stellar qualities,” says Wolozin, BUSM professor of Pharmacology.  “Joon is one of those rare scientists who is passionate about science and people.  Her work on Parkinson’s disease is revealing novel mechanisms through which micro-RNA contribute to the pathophysiology of the disease process.  At the same time, Joon’s enthusiasm for helping her friends and colleagues benefits everyone around her. Three cheers for Joon!”

  An award winning Taekwondo Master with a fourth-degree Black Belt, Boon coaches the BU Taekwondo Team. She has displayed her artwork and photography during BUSM Art Days, at Graduate Medical Science Art Day and in the BUSM literary and arts magazine. Chosen as the recipient of the first Graduate Medical Science Student Organization (GMSSO) Representative Award this year, she served as secretary of the GMSSO for two years and the pharmacology representative for the past five years. She volunteers in the greater Boston area, including with the Alzheimer’s Association, teaching Taekwondo and women’s self-defense seminars, and at fundraising events for the China Care Fund.

NIDA Awards BUSM’s Samet $5 Million Grant

September 17th, 2014 in Uncategorized

Jeffrey Samet

Jeffrey Samet

BUSM researcher Dr. Jeffrey Samet and Dr. Carlos Del Rio from Emory University were recently awarded a five year, $5 million grant from the National Institute of Drug Abuse for their project titled: Improving Physician Opioid Prescribing for Chronic Pain in HIV-infected Persons.

Prescription opioids are the second most commonly abused substances in the U.S. (after marijuana), and overdose deaths related to prescription opioids now exceed deaths from motor vehicle crashes. Prescription opioid abuse appears to be even more common among HIV-infected patients, presumably a consequence of the known co-morbidity between HIV and substance use.

The grant will fund the “Targeting Effective Analgesia in Clinics for HIV” (TEACH) Study. TEACH will test the effectiveness of a collaborative care intervention to improve the management of chronic opioid therapy and reduce the misuse of prescription opioids among HIV-infected persons.

“This is a novel randomized controlled trial of a chronic disease management intervention to improve the delivery of chronic opioid therapy and reduce prescription opioid misuse among HIV-infected persons. If demonstrated to be effective, this model could be adopted by clinics nationwide, may improve physician satisfaction and confidence with this challenging aspect of patient care, and has the potential to improve the health and well-being of persons with HIV,” explained Samet, principal investigator of the grant.

The study will be conducted within the BMC HIV clinic (CID) with Dr. Meg Sullivan, as a co-investigator.

 

 

Online Program for Medical Educators Allows Digital Display of Earned Competency

September 16th, 2014 in Uncategorized

CME-Accredited Course Advances Teaching Skills of Health Care Professionals

Medical educators have an opportunity to participate in a new, first-of-its kind online medical education badge program at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM). The BUSM+ Medical Education Badge Program (BUSM+Program) allows access to online faculty development in medical education and allows course graduates to display and share earned digital competency badges on social media, CVs and portfolio websites. The program is considered to be a form of digital micro-credentialing.

“The BUSM+ Program takes the concept of digital badging and applies it for an audience of health care providers (practicing and retired physicians, fellows, residents, medical students and healthcare teams) who may have missed educational courses in their professional career and are now teaching, or those healthcare providers who want to enhance their existing teaching skills,” explained Gail March, PhD, Assistant Professor of Medical Sciences & Education as well as Director of Instructional Design and Faculty Development at BUSM who founded the program.

According to March, the BUSM+ digital badge program is unique in that it is the first one for medical education faculty development. “There are faculty development programs available, but they are often very expensive and demand the health care provider leave their practice to attend. BUSM+ is available as an open (no application process), online, asynchronous program available 24/7 for a low cost,” she added.

This program is designed for practicing and retired health care professionals who educate other professionals, students and patients. Enrollees in the initial BUSM+Program course will review the fundamentals of teaching and learning. Three additional offerings are planned to follow the Teaching and Learning course including Curriculum Design, Academic Leadership and Medical Education Research.

BUSM+Program was funded earlier this year by an inaugural seed grant for online innovation from the Digital Learning Initiative at Boston University.

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Sept. 11 BUMC Sustainability Festival, Talbot Green

September 9th, 2014 in Uncategorized

festival

Two BUSM Students Named 2014 Benjamin H. Kean Travel Fellows in Tropical Medicine

September 8th, 2014 in Uncategorized

The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) announced the 2014 recipients of the Benjamin H. Kean Travel Fellowship in Tropical Medicine. Through a highly competitive process, 22 Fellows from 18 medical schools were selected including two from Boston University School of Medicine Katrina Ciraldo and Daniel Silva.

Katrina Ciraldo

Katrina Ciraldo

Daniel Silva

Daniel Silva

This Fellowship is the only medical student award dedicated to nurturing a career path for physician-scientists in tropical medicine. It is awarded annually to full-time medical students at accredited medical schools in North America. Fellows receive airfare and up to $1,000 in living expenses for a clinical training or research project that takes place in an area where tropical diseases are endemic. ASTMH, founded in 1903, is a worldwide organization of scientists, clinicians and program professionals whose mission is to promote global health through the prevention and control of infectious and other diseases that disproportionately afflict the global poor.

“The future of global health and tropical medicine is in great hands with a group as dynamic and committed as this class of Fellows,” said Kean Fellowship Committee Chair, Chandy John, MD, MS, University of Minnesota. “Headlines and news reports remind us that diseases that affect people in the tropics can have worldwide consequences. These fellows will be part of the next generation working to alleviate the suffering and long-term disability caused by these diseases.”

“This premier award is both honorific and substantive. It makes overseas training experiences for students interested in tropical disease possible, and works to build the ranks of physician-scientists focused on diseases in low-income countries,” said ASTMH President Alan Magill, MD, FASTMH. “The Fellowship enables these future leaders to expand their scientific networks, which in turn advances their professional contributions. As a Society, our goal is guide them towards fulfilling career options allowing them to do the work that helps improve the lives of so many who suffer needlessly from tropical disease.”

The Fellowship is named to honor Benjamin H. Kean, MD, (1912-1993), an internationally acclaimed tropical medicine expert and personal mentor to many of today’s world-renowned tropical medicine experts who were inspired by him as his students in medical school. Kean is also credited with discovering the causes of several diseases, including turista or travelers’ diarrhea.

BUSM Faculty and Framingham Heart Study Researchers Among Thompson Reuters’ World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014

August 21st, 2014 in Uncategorized

 

BUSM faculty members and Framingham Heart Study Researchers are listed in Thompson Reuters’ The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014. Reuters’ list of “some of the best and brightest scientific minds of our time” is determined by analyzing data on which researchers have produced work that is most frequently acknowledged by peers. Reuters analyzed at citation data over the last 11 years to identify those who published the highest impact work (2002-2012 and 2012-2013).

Faculty Michael Holick (medicine, physiology and biophysics) and Alice Jacobs (medicine/cardiology) are listed under clinical medicine as are BUSM/BU Framingham Heart Study researchers Emily Benjamin (medicine/cardiology), Ralph D’Agostino (mathematics/statistics), Martin Larson (mathematics/statistics), Daniel Levy (medicine/cardiology), Joseph Massaro (biostatistics), and Vasan Ramachandran (medicine/cardiology).

“Everyone acknowledged in this book is a person of influence in the sciences and social sciences. They are the people who are on the cutting edge of their fields. They are performing and publishing work that their peers recognize as vital to the advancement of their science. These researchers are, undoubtedly, among the most influential scientific minds of our time.” (Thompson Reuters’ The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014)

 

MED Student Presents Policy Relevant Research at New York Academy of Medicine

August 21st, 2014 in Uncategorized

Leslie Maness (second from right) at Mahoney Fellows 2014 Presentation

Leslie Maness (second from right) at Mahoney Fellows 2014 Presentation

 

On August 11, third-year BUSM student Leslie Maness, one of six 2014 Margaret E. Mahoney Fellows, presented her summer research project at the New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM). The Mahoney Fellowship program of the NYAM provides stipends for outstanding medical, dental, public health, public policy and graduate nursing students to conduct summer research projects on some aspect of health care delivery transformation for vulnerable populations and/or early childhood health and development with an emphasis on policy implications.

Maness conducted her research at New York University School of Medicine/Bellevue Hospital on the impact of low health literacy and limited English proficiency on parent/caregiver medication dosing errors when delivering liquid medications to children. She also participated in workshops on leadership, conflict management and negotiation, the policymaking process, and communications and media. Mahoney Fellows met with health care leaders including Dr. Donna Shalala, former Secretary for Health and Human Services; Dr. Lilliam Barrios-Paoli, New York Deputy Mayor for Health and Human Services; Dr. Mary Bassett, New York City Health Commissioner; Dr. Pamela Riley, Assistant Vice President for Delivery System Reform at The Commonwealth Fund; and Dr. Robert Brook, Distinguished Chair in Health Care Services at the RAND Corporation.

“This is quite a unique fellowship, in that it provides graduate health professions students with an introduction to the health policy world and opportunities for engagement with health policy leaders at this formative stage in their education and career,” said NYAM President Jo Ivey Boufford, MD. “It is our hope that the Mahoney Fellows will each build this connection into their career trajectory.”