Christine Cary Cheston, MD

Assistant Professor, Pediatrics

Christine Cheston

Biography

Christine Cheston, MD is an Assistant Professor of Pediatrics in Emergency Medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine. She graduated Chief Resident of the Boston Combined Residency Program (BCRP). Dr. Cheston completed her undergraduate degree at the University of Virginia, and her medical training at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She completed her pediatric residency in the Urban Health and Advocacy Track of the BCRP. As a senior resident, she received a Harvard Medical Student Teaching Award. She has published important work on the emerging role of social media in medical education and in the BCRP has had early success as a QI leader, most notably with a medical interpreter project, which aims to consistently incorporate interpreters into family-centered rounds with non-English speaking families. She is passionate about formulating innovative educational strategies that teach residents how quality improvement solutions can address problems of health inequity to address social determinants of health.

Education

  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, MD
  • University of Virginia, BA

Publications

  • Published on 8/1/2018

    Cheston CC, Alarcon LN, Martinez JF, Hadland SE, Moses JM. Evaluating the Feasibility of Incorporating In-Person Interpreters on Family-Centered Rounds: A QI Initiative. Hosp Pediatr. 2018 Aug; 8(8):471-478. PMID: 30018123.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 3/24/2015

    Roy D, Taylor J, Cheston CC, Flickinger TE, Chisolm MS. Social Media: Portrait of an Emerging Tool in Medical Education. Acad Psychiatry. 2016 Feb; 40(1):136-40. PMID: 25800704.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 7/1/2014

    Batt-Rawden S, Flickinger T, Weiner J, Cheston C, Chisolm M. The role of social media in clinical excellence. Clin Teach. 2014 Jul; 11(4):264-9. PMID: 24917094.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 6/1/2013

    Cheston CC, Flickinger TE, Chisolm MS. Social media use in medical education: a systematic review. Acad Med. 2013 Jun; 88(6):893-901. PMID: 23619071.

    Read at: PubMed
  • Published on 4/19/2010

    Tchouaffi-Nana F, Ballard TE, Cary CH, Macdonald TL, Sifri CD, Hoffman PS. Nitazoxanide inhibits biofilm formation by Staphylococcus epidermidis by blocking accumulation on surfaces. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2010 Jul; 54(7):2767-74. PMID: 20404119.

    Read at: PubMed

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