Visible Progress on the Student Residence

in Uncategorized
June 14th, 2011

As you travel down Albany Street past the new Student Residence, you have no doubt seen the black material billowing in the wind (see image A).

Black material draped on residence.

(Image A) Black material draped on residence.

This is just one of the one of the more visible signs of progress. The fabric is used when construction workers are spraying fireproofing materials onto the steel, an important and necessary step in the construction process.

While the construction cranes have been removed from the site, a smaller device serves as a lift or elevator to move people and materials into the floors above ground level (see image B).

(Image  ) Orange lift to move materials and people.

(Image B ) Orange lift to move materials and people.

On the ground, the only visible signs of the concrete work that is being done on the roof and penthouse is the concrete pumper truck that shoots concrete through a long tube up to the building site (see image C)

Some things you can’t easily see from the street include the roof tie-down installation. This is the first step in building the roof of the structure.

(Image C) Cement pumper truck.

(Image C) Cement pumper truck.

On the sixth and seventh floors the upper track has been completed. This is part of the layout of the internal walls and is done to coordinate the installation of other utilities. Sewer and water utility work is anticipated to start the week of June 13.

Please keep in mind that the Albany Street road work has begun.

The nine-story, $40 million structure is designed by Beacon Architectural Associates with a brick and limestone façade. Its 104 two-bedroom suites that include bath, kitchenette and living spaces will accommodate 208 students, each with individual bedrooms, the standard for graduate student housing. Walsh Brothers is the contractor for the building, which is expected to take 18 months to complete.

Click below to see earlier updates on the student residence construction.