Faculty

Our Leadership Team:

Alan Moss MD, AGAF, FACG, FEBG, FRCPI is a clinician-scientist with an expertise in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), and   Professor of Medicine at Boston University. He completed his clinical training at University College Dublin and Harvard Medical School-affiliated programs. As Interim Chief of the section of Gastroenterology and Director of the Crohn’s & Colitis Program at Boston Medical Center, he leads a multi-disciplinary team for IBD care. He has over 200 publications, and received research funding from NIDDK, AGA, the Helmsley Foundation and the Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation. Current research interests include exosomes as biomarkers, microbial therapies, and vitamin-D related immunology. He has held leadership roles in the AGA and Crohn’s & Colitis Foundation, and as a member of scientific review boards for NIH, European Union and many national research agencies.

Ansu Noronha, MD is a clinician-scientist with an expertise in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Boston University. She completed her clinical training at Boston Medical Center after receiving her MD from Jefferson Medical College. As a clinician in the Crohn’s and Colitis Program at Boston Medical Center, she works as a part of a multi-disciplinary team of gastroenterologists, nutritionists, colorectal surgeons and pharmacists. Current research/clinical interests include the role of the microbiome in GI conditions including IBD, is trained in fecal microbiota transplant and chromoendoscopy. She is also the Clinical Director for the Section of Gastroenterology.

 Christopher S. Huang, MD is Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine and is Director of Endoscopy Services at Boston Medical Center. He graduated from Cornell University in 1994 and then attended New Jersey Medical School (1994-1998) before completing his Internal Medicine Residency at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He then completed his Gastroenterology Fellowship training at Boston Medical Center in 2004 and stayed on to join the faculty. His clinical interests include colonoscopy, capsule endoscopy, and therapeutic /advanced endoscopy techniques such as ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound, endoscopic mucosal resection, and enteral stenting. His professional interests include endoscopy education, and he has taught at and co-directed several national endoscopy courses for first year GI fellows. He has served on various institutional, local, and national committees including the the Seven Year Liberal Arts/Medical Education Program Admissions Committee at Boston University, the Education Committee of the Massachusetts Gastroenterology Association, and the Training Committee of the American Society For Gastrointestinal Endoscopy.

Sharmeel K Wasan, MD, FACG is a clinician-educator with an expertise in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University. She completed her clinical training at Boston Medical Center, the Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and the University of Maryland. She received her BS in Biological Sciences and BA in Anthropology from Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA and received her MD from Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. As the Fellowship Program Director for the Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at Boston Medical Center, she is actively involved in the training of fellows, residents, and medical students. Her current clinical and research interests include vaccination strategies, health care maintenance in patients with IBD, and educational strategies in endoscopy training and has received research and educational grants from BU and from industry supported funding.

Robert C. Lowe, MD is a clinician-Educator with an expertise in Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and the Assistant Dean of Medical Education at Boston University. He is a graduate of Harvard Medical School, trained in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and completed his GI fellowship training at Boston Medical Center. He is the Director of the Gastroenterology Course at the Boston University School of Medicine, as well as an Associate Clerkship director in Internal Medicine. At BMC, he is a Key Faculty member in the IM residency program and Director of the Medical Education Pathway for internal medicine residents. He has receive numerous awards for his clinical teaching, including the Massachusetts Medical Society Award for Excellence in Medical Student Education. Current clinical interests include viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver disease, and metabolic liver diseases. He serves nationally on the American Gastroenterological Association’s Maintenance of Certification Committee.

Our Faculty:

Uri, Avissar, MD is a clinician-educator with an expertise in gastroenterology and liver transplant and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Boston University. He completed his clinical training at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. He received his BS in Chemistry from Yale University in New Haven, CT and received his MD from University of Rochester Medical Center in NY. His clinical interests include general gastroenterology, hepatology, and liver transplant. He is actively involved in the training of fellows, residents, and medical students.

Juanita Belton, PA-C, MPH joined Boston University Medical Center’s Dempsey Center for Digestive Disease in 2018 as a Physician Assistant in the Crohn’s and Colitis Research Center. She specializes in Inflammatory Bowel Disease and general GI, including IBS, GERD, and abdominal pain. Mrs. Belton received her Bachelor of Biology from the Historically Black College Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia. She went on to attend Boston University School of Public Health Concentrating in Maternal and Child Health. After earning her MPH, she joined BMC’s Project Trust for three years providing HIV, Hep C, and STD testing and Education. She left Project Trust to attend Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences earning her Masters in Physician Assistant Studies. She has 10 years experience practicing as a Physician Assistant. Before bringing her skills to BMC, she previously practiced Gastroenterology and Primary Care at Cambridge Health Alliance in Everett, MA and in Correctional Medicine at Hampden Correctional Center in Western, Mass. She is currently an Instructor in Gastroenterology at Boston University School of Medicine and is the leader of the sections Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee.

 Charles Bliss Jr., MD, AGAF, FACP, is a clinician with expertise in H. pylori and Assistant Professor of Medicine at Boston University. He received his MD from Boston University, and did residency at Boston City Hospital, and fellowship at Boston University. He has continued to care for patients at Boston Medical Center and East Boston Neighborhood Health Center since finishing his training. He also has served on the BU Committee on Appeals and the Awards Committee.

Lizabeth M. Cline, NP, MSN received her BS in Nursing in 1982 from Boston University and her MSN from Syracuse University in 1995. Ms. Cline’s clinical focus is liver disease including fatty liver disease and viral hepatitis. She is currently an Instructor in Gastroenterology at Boston University School of Medicine

 

 Anna J. Craig, PA-C, is a clinician and Instructor of medicine at Boston University. She completed her clinical training at Rochester Institute of Technology. Current clinical interests include functional disorders such as irritable bowel syndrome, use of complementary and alternative therapies in GI disorders, and nutrition.

 

David R. Lichtenstein, MD is the Director of Advanced Gastrointestinal Endoscopy at Boston Medical Center and Professor of Medicine (pending) at Boston University School of Medicine.  Dr. Lichtenstein received his medical doctorate from the University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine. He completed his internal medicine residency at Duke University Medical Center and a gastroenterology fellowship at Beth Israel Hospital in Boston.  He returned to Duke University Medical Center where he served as a Chief Resident in Internal Medicine followed by training in interventional endoscopy. Dr. Lichtenstein is a recognized educator in the GI endoscopy community and currently serves on the ABIM Gastroenterology Board Exam Committee and is the Chair of the ASGE Technology Committee.  He also serves on the ASGE Infection control Task Force and Education Curriculum and Competencies Council.  Dr. Lichtenstein served as the past president of the New England Endoscopy Society, the Chair of the Assessment and Certification Task Force that introduced the series of STARS educational programs for the ASGE and was a former Chair of the ERCP Section for the Annual Scientific Program Committee for Digestive Disease Week.  His research interests focus on advancing technologies for endoscopic management of complex GI disorders.  Most recently he is the principle investigator and advisory board member for an artificial intelligence deep neural network device that will help improve adenoma detection during colonoscopy and facilitate other aspects of quality metrics in colonoscopy.  He also serves on the clinical events committee for a randomized study of patients with pancreatic cancer that uses an EUS implanted device that may allow augmented doses of radiation to the primary pancreatic tumor.

Michelle T. Long, MD, MSc is a physician-scientist with an expertise in Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University. She completed her clinical training at Massachusetts General Hospital and Boston Medical Center. Dr. Long is the Director of the NAFLD Research Center and the Director of Clinical Research for the Section of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Her clinical and research interests center on the relationship between NAFLD and cardiovascular disease. Dr. Long is primarily interested in patient-oriented research investigating fibrosis and inflammation in patients with NAFLD and in imaging and risk stratification strategies for hepatic fibrosis. Dr. Long has projects at Boston Medical Center and at the Framingham Heart Study where she is the PI of a study evaluating the prevalence and risk factors for liver fat (steatosis) and fibrosis. In Framingham, she is investigating the clinical and genetic correlates of hepatic steatosis and fibrosis as measured by transient elastography. Dr. Long receives research funding from the NIH (NIDDK), Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, Gilead Sciences, Echosens Corporation, and Boston University. She has expertise in epidemiology, visceral fat, liver imaging including computed tomography, ultrasound, and transient elastography. Dr. Long is also a clinical hepatologist and endoscopist.  Dr. Long is additionally interested in novel therapeutics for NAFLD and Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and runs the clinical trials program for the NAFLD Research Center. Her other research interests include alcohol-related liver disease, hepatitis C, outcomes in end-stage liver disease/cirrhosis.

Arpan Mohanty, MD is a clinical hepatologist at Boston Medical Center and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. She completed  residency training in Internal Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and fellowship training in Digestive Diseases at Yale University. She is also trained in Advanced/Transplant hepatology at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Mohanty’s research focuses on end stage liver disease and its complications. She has expertise and interest in biomarker development and outcomes research in portal hypertension. Dr. Mohanty has been recognized by several awards including the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) Advanced/Transplant Hepatology Award and AASLD Pilot Research Award. Her research on biomarker development using spectroscopic markers of gut mucosal circulation is currently funded under an R21 (co-PI) from the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities. She serves in the Portal Hypertension education subcommittee of the AASLD.

 Thomas C. Moore, MD is a clinician with an expertise in gastrointestinal motility, and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Boston University. He completed his gastroenterology fellowship at Boston University School of Medicine. He completed his undergraduate studies at Yale University and received his medical degree from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. His clinical interests are gastrointestinal motility disorders, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and functional bowel disorders.

David Nunes MD, FRCPI is a clinician and clinical investigator with an interest in liver disease and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Boston University.  He completed his clinical training at Trinity College Dublin.  He is the Director of the Hepatology Program at Boston Medical Center and has held prior research grants from the NIDDK, and Industry supported funding.  He also has a continued limited role in research including clinical outcomes related to hepatitis C treatment and non-invasive assessment of liver fibrosis.

Paul C. Schroy, MD, MPH, is Emeritus Professor of Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine with expertise in the area of colorectal cancer screening and surveillance. He has over 150 publications, and received research funding from NCI, AHRQ, CDC and ACS. Dr. Schroy’s most recent research activities have focused primarily on the development, implementation and evaluation of model programs for community-based colorectal cancer control, including: (1) exploring the role of shared decision-making as a strategy for increasing patient participation in colorectal cancer screening; (2) better defining the epidemiology of colorectal neoplasia and the development of risk assessment tools for predicting the presence of advanced neoplasia at screening colonoscopy; (3) evaluating the feasibility and validity of novel colorectal cancer screening strategies such as stool-based DNA testing and virtual colonoscopy; (4) implementation of quality measures related to colorectal cancer screening; and (5) developing strategies to reduce the public health burden of early-onset colorectal cancer. In addition to his commitment to patient care and clinical research, Dr. Schroy is a founding member and former chair of the Massachusetts Colorectal Cancer Working Group and a founding member of the National Colorectal Cancer Round table. He has served in numerous leadership positions for the Round table, including current co-chair of the Family History and Early Onset Colorectal Cancer Task Group, former member of the Steering Committee, former co-chair of the Public Education Task Group, former co-chair of the Screening 65+ Task Group, and former chair of the Nomination Committee. He is also a former member of the Steering Committee of the Massachusetts Comprehensive Cancer Prevention and Control Network, the American Cancer Society’s New England Division’s Colorectal Cancer Advisory Committee and the Massachusetts Department of Public Health’s Cancer Registry Advisory Committee.

Kathleen Sullivan, MA, MSN, NP is a Gastroenterology Nurse Practitioner at Boston Medical Center and Assistant Professor of Gastroenterology at Boston University School of Medicine. Ms. Sullivan attended nursing school at the MGH Institute of Health Professions and she has a Master of Arts in Clinical Mental Health Counseling from Lesley University in Cambridge, MA.  She is the 2019 recipient of a Boston University Faculty Development and Diversity Committee Grant to attend Stress Management and Resiliency Training (SMART) at the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital.  Her clinical interests include non-pharmacological approaches to the management of functional gastrointestinal disorders such as IBS.  She is particularly interested in the use of stress reduction techniques, nutritional changes, dietary supplements, exercise, and the use of complementary medical treatments such as acupuncture in order to help her patients improve their overall health and sense of well-being

 Horst C. Weber, MD, FACG, AGAF, is a clinician-scientist with an expertise in gastrointestinal hormones, neuroendocrine tumors, and functional bowel disorders, and is Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at Boston University School of Medicine. He completed his clinical training at the University of Mainz, Georgetown University, and the National Institutes of Health. He published over 150 original reports, reviews, book chapters, and abstracts, and received research funding from the NIDDK, ACG, DoD, and the Medical Foundation. Current research interests include healthcare disparities in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and he has directed many CME programs on GERD and functional bowel disorders. He holds leadership roles in the ACG, and serves on Editorial boards of several biomedical journals.