Social Worker Joins Parkinson’s Disease & Movement Disorders Center

January 7th, 2010

Dr. Marie Saint-Hilaire, Medical Director of the Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center is pleased to welcome social worker, Allyson Litos Gormley. She recently joined the center’s team at Boston University/Boston Medical Center effective January 4th, 2010. “Having a dedicated social worker will enhance our delivery of care,” says Dr. Saint-Hilaire. Cathi Thomas, the center’s program director, welcomes this opportunity to not only provide support to our patient population but also expand much needed support to family caregivers.

Ms. Gormley’s practice will include patient and family counseling, and resource management for individuals affected by Parkinson’s disease, Huntington’s disease, and other movement disorders. She received a Bachelor of Science in Human Science and Service from the University of Rhode Island and a Master of Social Work from the Boston University School of Social Work. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker. For additional information or to schedule an appointment please call (617) 638-7747 or (617) 638-8456.

Inosine Research Study in Parkinson’s Disease

July 28th, 2009

Parkinson’s Disease Drug Study

Do you have:
* Tremors or shaking?
* Slowed movements?
* Small handwriting?
* Stiffness?
* Poor balance or problems walking?

All of these may be symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

You may qualify for a PD drug study if you:

* Were diagnosed with PD within the last 3 years or if you are experiencing some of the above symptoms
* Are not currently taking medication for your PD
* Do not have a history of gout or kidney stones
 

Eligible participants will receive study-related evaluations, laboratory tests, and the investigational drug at no cost.  For more information about this study, please contact:Boston University Medical Center  Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center at 617-638-7737 or 617-638-7745.

IRB # H-28452

Coenzyme Q10 Research Study for Parkinson’s Disease Patients

July 2nd, 2009

Coenzyme Q10 Research Study for Parkinson’s Disease Patients

IRB H-27250

There is a clinical study of the research medication Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) in persons 30 years of age or older who have early stage Parkinson’s disease. The purpose of this research study is to find out whether CoQ can slow the progression of early Parkinson’s Disease.

Those diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease within the last 5 years and are not yet receiving treatment for their symptoms may be eligible. Study doctors will follow participants every four months over a 16-month period.

There is no cost to participate in the study. Persons with early stage Parkinson’s disease who are interested in participating in this study should contact the Boston University Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center at 617-638-7737.

Parkinson’s Disease : A Guide to Patient Care co-authored by Boston University Department of Neurology faculty member

July 2nd, 2009

Parkinson’s Disease : A Guide to Patient Care 
Paul Tuite, MD, Cathi Thomas RN, MS, Laura Ruekert, PharmD, RPh, and Hubert Fernandez, MD
Springer Publishing Company, 2009

This book designed for allied healthcare professionals, including nurses, rehabilitation specialists and social workers, is a quick, easily organized referencecovering all aspects of managing Parkinson’s disease. The book is divided into four sections: Problems, Evaluation, Treatment Strategies and Appendices.

Boston University Researchers present abstracts at the 13th International Congress of Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders in June

July 2nd, 2009

Efficacy of self-management rehabilitation on quality of life outcomes in Parkinson’s disease 
Authors: L. Tickle-Degnen, T. Ellis, M. Saint-Hilaire, C.A. Thomas, R.C. Wagenaar     

Effectiveness of an inpatient movement disorders program for patients with Parkinson’s disease and predictors of rehabilitation outcome 
Authors: T. Ellis, D.I. Katz, T.J. DePiero, D.K. White, C.L. Hehl, A. Leonard, V. Allen, K. Griffith, J. Dentino, M. Gardner, H. Phenix, K. Wilford, A.D. Hohler, M. Saint-Hilaire 
      
Screening for orthostatic hypotension in patients with Parkinson’s disease may help to decrease morbidity and mortality: Database analysis from acute rehabilitation facility 
Authors: K. Wilford, A. Leonard, T. Ellis, J. DePiero, D. Katz, A. Hohler 
   
Task-specific bilateral arm freezing in subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation (STN DBS) in Parkinson’s disease (PD) 
Authors: S.A. Ellias 
   
Wearable sensor system for monitoring motor function in Parkinson patients 
Authors: S.H. Roy, H.S. Nawab, D.L. Gilmore, S. Chang, B.T. Cole,
C.A. Thomas, M.-H. Saint-Hilaire, J.F. Jabre, C.J. De Luca 
   

Boston University faculty present research at this year’s Annual American Academy of Neurology meeting.

May 18th, 2009

Dr. Kesha Wilford presented a poster titled "Screening for orthostatic
hypotension in patients with Parkinson’s disease may help to decrease
morbidity and mortality: database analysis from an acute rehabilitation
facility"
  this April at the 2009 Annual American Academy of Neurology
meeting.  Additional authors were: Alissa Leonard, PT; Terry Ellis, PT,
PhD; Joy DePiero, MD; Douglas Katz, MD; Anna Hohler, MD.  The research
was conducted in collaboration between  Boston University School of
Medicine, Boston Medical Center, and the Braintree Rehabilitation
Center. 

The poster will also be presented at the Annual International Movement
Disorders conference in Paris June 2009.

Boston University PD Forum 2009

March 30th, 2009

The 3rd Annual Parkinson’s Disease Forum was held this year at the Boston University Photonics Center on February 12th in an effort to energize new cross-disciplinary research programs. Clinicians and scientists from across campus came together to present their research on Parkinson’s through lectures and a poster session.

PD forum organizer Dr. Ben Wolozin designed a program that allowed many presenters an opportunity to describe their research projects and results to date. Dr. Marie Saint-Hilaire, Medical Director of the APDA Advanced Center for Research said, “The PD Forum advances goals of Parkinson’s Research, highlights the accomplishments of researchers at Boston University and enhances clinical care.”

At the forum, President of Boston University, Dr. Robert Brown, commended the university faculty on their collaborative work. He encouraged everyone to utilize their vibrant mix of knowledge, techniques and approaches to solve the complex puzzle that is Parkinson’s.

At the close, Dr’s Wolozin and Saint-Hilaire recapped the day’s scientific and clinical research findings, while Dr. Alice Cronin-Golomb gave chase with closing remarks and stirring questions about the implications of what we know and on future project cooperation.

Researchers involved came from the following BU Departments: Neurology, Pharmacology, Biochemistry, Anatomy, Genetics, Public Health, Bio-Informatics, Biomedical Engineering, Psychology, Neurorehabilitation and Neuromuscular Research.

You can read a summary of the research presented at the Forum and view event photos.

- Raymond James, BSc
Research Coordinator, BUMC Neurology

Research Study Evaluating Aplindore in Early Parkinson’s Disease

March 24th, 2009

A clinical study of the research medication Aplindore in persons 30 years of age or older who have early stage Parkinson’s disease is recruiting subjects to participate. The purpose of this research study is to find out whether Aplindore can effectively treat the symptoms of Parkinson’s Disease.

There is no cost to participate in the study. Persons with early stage Parkinson’s disease who are interested in participating in this study should contact the Boston University Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorder Center at 617-638-7737.

Benjamin Wolozin MD, PhD, Professor of Pharmacology and Neurology receives research grant from the Michael J. Fox Foundation

August 14th, 2008

Benjamin Wolozin MD, PhD, Professor of Pharmacology at Boston University School of Medicine, has received a research grant from the Michael J. Fox Foundation 2008 Target Validation Program for Parkinson’s disease research. The study is entitled SIRT1 Activators as Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease. Click the title to learn more.

Research Study Evaluating an Individual’s Risk of Developing Parkinson’s Disease (PARS)

August 13th, 2008

The new study is called Parkinson’s Associated Risk Factor Study (PARS). IRB # H-26493.

You may be eligible to join if:

  • You have a first-degree relative (mother, father, sibling, or child) diagnosed with Parkinson disease
  • Your age is 50 years or older
  • You have not been diagnosed with Parkinson disease yourself
  • Your have no history of nasal trauma or surgery involving your nose or sinuses

If you are interested in participating, please contact us 617-638-7737.

CLICK HERE for more information on the study.

Directory|BUMC
February 10, 2010
Primary teaching affiliate
of BU School of Medicine