Meet the Program Directors

   

http://www.bumc.bu.edu/microbiology/files/2002/03/Wetzler1.gif

Lee Wetzler, M.D.

Dr. Wetzler currently directs the BU-TPID. Work in Dr. Wetzler’s laboratory investigates innate and adaptive immunity and microbial pathogenesis, especially in regards to vaccine development. One major aspect of this work centers on the pathogenic Neisseria, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis.  We have found that the major outer membrane protein of these organisms, the Neisserial porin PorB, can work as an immune adjuvant due to it recognition by the pattern recognition receptor TOLL-like receptor (TLR) 2.  We have found that antigen presenting cells, including B cells, dendritic cells and macrophages, are activated by PorB in a TLR2, TLR1 and MyD88 dependent manner, inducting upregulation of class II MHC, costimulatory molecule CD86 and other markers of activation.  Moreover, MAPK signaling events are required for the upregulation of the expression of these markers, as well as production of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

We are investigating the use of this TLR2 ligand, PorB, as a vaccine adjuvant using classic antigens i.e. OVA,  and more relevant antigens, i.e. bacterial capsular polysaccharide.  We are also comparing the PorB adjuvant activity to other classical and investigative adjuvants including Alum, MF59, CpG DNA and MPL.  We have shown that PorB adjuvant activity is absolutely MyD88 dependent and also largely dependent on the presence of TLR2 (even though there is still some adjuvant activity in TLR2 KO mice).  Utilizing conditional KO mice (using the Cre-Lox system) we have discerned that MyD88 signaling in B cells, Dendritic Cells (DC) and Macrophages are essential for the PorB adjuvant activity.  Surprisingly, the presence of MyD88 in macrophages seems to be the most essential component needed for this adjuvant activity.  Investigations are ongoing in this area.   Moreover, we have shown that PorB can enhance both antigen uptake and antigen presenting cell trafficking (especially DCs and macrophages) and these effects are mainly TLR2 dependent.  We have recently begun investigating the effect of PorB on germinal center formation and have found that this molecule is extremely potent in inducting germinal centers and proliferating B cells.  Interestingly, if MyD88 is conditionally KO’d in macrophages, these germinal center findings are abrogated.  Using these same mice we have found that PorB induces both Th1 and Th2 type responses as determined by cytokine profiles and IgG isotypes.  PorB induced a greater breadth of response in this regard as compared to Alum, MF59 and MPL.  We are currently investigating the mechanisms behind these findings.

We have also begun a systems immunologic analysis of the adjuvant activity of PorB.  We have found that PorB induces a genetic program consisting of genes and gene sets needed for immunoglobulin synthesis and cellular proliferation after only one or two immunizations as opposed to a greater number of immunizations of antigen alone to induce a similar response.  We are still investigating the genes induced and shall compare these results to results obtained with other adjuvants (both TLR dependent and independent) to determine if these results can be used to correlate with different responses induced by various adjuvants (i.e. Th types, IgG isotypes etc., as mentioned above).  This also revealed that PorB can induce certain profiles of micro RNAs that may also be associated with its immune stimulating properties and we are in the midst of studies to further address these interesting findings.

A significant new set of studies currently being performed win collaboration with Dr. Scott Gray-Owen at the University of Toronto is the examination of a new murine model for gonococcal infections


08-2140-053Selim Ünlü, Ph.D.

Dr. Ünlü will now serve as Associate Program Director of the BU-TPID.  His research focuses on development of label-free biodetection with emphasis on immunoassays and protein-DNA micro-arrays. Dr. Ünlü  is the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Program in the College of Engineering and has the responsibility of all aspects of graduate student recruiting, training and mentoring. Dr. Ünlü has graduated 15 PhD students and he is currently training 8 PhDs and 4 postdoctoral fellows. Dr. Genco and Dr. Ünlü have an existing collaboration on a NIAID funded RO1 and have an established working relationship. Ünlü and his collogues have worked with several BU interdisciplinary training programs consisting of faculty across departments, schools and campuses.