History

Boston University established the School of Medicine in 1873 by merging with the New England Female Medical College, which had been founded in 1848 as the first medical college for women in the world. The first Black woman physician in the United States, Dr. Rebecca Lee, was a graduate of the New England Female Medical College. The country’s first African-American psychiatrist, Dr. Solomon Carter Fuller, was a graduate of Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) as is Dr. Louis Sullivan, former Secretary of Health and Human Services. The School of Medicine became a constituent member of the Boston University Medical Center (BUMC) in 1962. It is situated in the South End of Boston adjacent to the Boston Medical Center Hospital. BUMC includes the School of Medicine, the School of Public Health, the Goldman School of Graduate Dentistry, the Boston University Medical Center Hospital, and units such as the Humphrey Cancer Research Center, the Whitaker Cardiovascular Institute and BioSquare, a $350 million business park being developed by Boston University and Boston Medical Center Hospital to support innovation in science and business.

Dr. Louis Sullivan BUSM 1958 and Morehouse College Graduate, with Morehouse College Graduates currently enrolled at BUSM, from Left to Right, David Jones BUSM 2008, Dr. Sullivan, Joshua Joseph BUSM 2007, and Antonio Rozier BUSM 2008.
Dr. Louis Sullivan BUSM 1958 and Morehouse College Graduate, with Morehouse College Graduates currently enrolled at BUSM, from Left to Right, David Jones BUSM 2008, Dr. Sullivan, Joshua Joseph BUSM 2007, and Antonio Rozier BUSM 2008.

Boston University has demonstrated a unique commitment to the creation of educational opportunities for minority students interested in pursuing careers in medicine. The Office of Diversity and Multi-Cultural Affairs (ODMA) was created in 1972 in an effort to increase the number of disadvantaged and underrepresented minority medical students. Today the Office of Minority Affairs administers multiple programs, all of which are designed to increase the number of under represented minority students pursuing careers in medicine and other biomedical sciences.