Course Descriptions

Nutrition Courses:

Note: in addition to these required nutrition coures, students are required to complete one course each in biostatisticss and epidemiology, as well as electives in their areas of interest.

GMS NU 755 Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition I: Energy Balance and Micronutrients (Prerequisite: at least one semester each of biochemistry and physiology, or equivalent, and permission of the instructor)

This is the first semester of a 2 semester sequence (that can be taken in either order) that focuses on the Physiological, Biochemical and Molecular Bases of Nutrition. This semester will cover concepts of essential nutrients and methods for determining their requirements (DRIs), body composition, nutrition and growth, energy expenditure, regulation of energy intake, vitamins and macro-mineral metabolism(Ca, P) and micronutrients. Functions and roles of micronutrients in signaling from gene to whole organism will be discussed. Implications for nutrient requirements through the lifecycle and in health and disease will be addressed. A discussion session will teach students to critically evaluate cutting-edge and seminal papers addressing each topic, and introduce students to state of the art research approaches and methodologies – basic (cell and molecular), clinical and epidemiological. Weekly writing assignmentson the papers will provide experience and hone skills with scientific writing. (Fried, 4 cr, Fall)

GMS NU 804 Directed Studies in Nutrition and Metabolism Directed studies of a specific advanced topic with a faculty member. (any semester)

GMS NU 901, 902 Research in Nutrition and Metabolism. This course number is used during the period of your dissertation research. (Variable cr, any semester)

GMS NU 620 Clinical Nutrition Research (Prereq: Human Physiology or equivalent, consent of instructor. Prereq or Coreq NU 755 or 756).

The course will focus on disease states related to nutrition and diet, with a major focus on clinical nutrition research. The course goals are as follows: (1) acquaint students with current concepts and methods in clinical nutrition research, (2) familiarize students with clinical research and how investigators approach nutrition-related questions in their specific fields to answer questions related to disease states, (3) evaluate the role of nutrition as it relates to development, prevention and therapy of major diseases, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, gastrointestinal disorders, osteoporosis, obesity, and cancer. (Moore, 3 cr, Spring).

GMS NU 700 Nutrition & Metabolism Seminar: Students develop and present a research seminar. (Fried and Moore 2 cr, Spring).

GMS NU 756 Molecular, Biochemical and Physiologic Bases of Nutrition: Macronutrients (Prerequisite: at least one semester each of biochemistry and physiology and permission of the instructor)

Regulation of lipid, carbohydrate, and protein digestion, absorption, transport, tissue and cellular metabolism. Integration of macronutrient metabolism in response to alteration in nutritional status (e.g. starvation, obesity) on a whole body and tissue-specific basis. Mechanism regulating macronutrient metabolism in response to stresses such as exercise and aging and disease. A discussion session will teach students to critically evaluate research papers, provide knowledge of seminal papers in the field, and introduce students to research approaches and state of the art methods (e.g. assessment of metabolic flux using stable isotopes, euglycemic clamps, metabolomics). (Fried, 2 cr, Spring).

FiBS Curriculum (required of Doctoral Students)

The four cores of FiBS (701-704) will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence.

GMS FC 701 Foundations in Biomedical Sciences I: Protein Structure, Catalysis and In teraction The first module of the Foundations in Biomedical Science course “Protein structure, catalysis and interactions” will provide students with a quantitative understanding of protein structure, function, posttranslational modification and the turnover of proteins in the cell. In addition, students will gain facility with thermodynamics, catalysis, kinetics and binding equilibria as they apply to proteins and also to other molecules in biological systems (e.g. nucleic acids, lipids, vitamins, etc.). This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. (Course Managers: McKnight, Nugent. 2 cr, Fall sem).

GMS FC 702 Foundations in Biomedical Sciences II: Structure and Function of the Genome The second module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of biological processes that influence the inheritance, regulation, and utilization of genes. Genetic and genomic, molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course I part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. (Course Managers: Dasgupta, Viglianti. 2 cr, Fall sem).

GMS FC 703 Foundations in Biomedical Sciences III: Architecture & Dynamics of the Cell The third module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the movement of proteins and membranes with the cell, the secretory process, the cytoskeletal framework of the cell and the resulting cell-cell interaction and communication with the matrix. Molecular, cell biological, and biochemical experimental approaches to understanding these processes will be explored. In addition, we will discuss the possibilities of utilizing these technologies in medical treatments. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Science. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete, progressive sequence. (Course Managers: Trinkaus-Randall, Zoeller. 2 cr, Fall sem).

GMS FC 704 Foundations in Biomedical Sciences IV: Mechanisms of Cell Communication

The fourth module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences course will focus on the mechanisms of cell communication. This module will begin by discussing overarching concepts before examining the specific types of molecules that initiate and transduce signals. Examples of cell signaling and subsequent cellular responses will then be considered in different contexts to provide a framework on which future learning can be applied. As the module progresses, the complexity of the systems explored will increase from individual cells to multicellular environments such as tissues, organs, and organisms. In addition, normal processes as well as the dysregulation of cell-cell communication is disease will be studied. This course is part of a series of four core integrated courses and additional elective courses aimed towards first year Ph.D. students in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences. The four cores will be integrated in content and structure, and therefore are intended to be taken as a complete progressive sequence. (Course Managers: Symes, Hsu. 2 cr, Spring sem).

GMS FC706 Molecular Metabolism (Prerequisites FC 701-704 or equivalent with permission of the instructors) This module of the Foundations in Biomedical Sciences curriculum focuses on the biochemical, cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate cell and tissue-specific fuel metabolism. The course will present an integrated view of biochemistry and the control of cellular and organismal functions with regard to nutrient utilization. Classes include small group discussions of key papers. Mechanisms that allow cells to survive variations in nutrient supply (starvation, feeding, nutrient stress) and metabolic derangements that contribute to disease pathogenesis (e.g. diabetes, obesity, cancer) will be discussed. (Course Managers: Fried, Pilch, 2 cr Spring)

Back to Nutrition & Metabolism Home Page

Back to GMS Home Page