Category: BMFS

Seminar 12/3: Autopsy of President Kennedy Fact v. Fiction

November 13th, 2014 in BMFS, General News

Dr  Cummings - JFK seminar 12.14

Forensic Anthropology Program Joins TRACES in Decomposition Project

July 2nd, 2014 in Academics, BMFS, General News

The Graduate Program in Forensic Anthropology, within the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences at Boston University School of Medicine has been invited to participate in a multi-site international taphonomy (decomposition) study to establish the natural decomposition of tissues from day zero until they become fully skeletonized or mummified. BU’s team, including Program Director, Dr. Tara Moore, Associate Director, Dr. Donald Siwek and Board Certified Forensic Anthropologist Dr. James Pokines has committed to the placement of 10  pigs in their decomposition field, located on 32 acres in Holliston, MA. They will be documenting temperature, rain and the progression of decomposition. The data collection includes recordings of a Total Body Score subject to a graded scale for the head and neck area, trunk and limbs. The ultimate endpoint is when samples achieve full skeletonization and the decomposition process has come to a stop. This particular project is expected to reveal how decomposition is affected by temperature changes around the globe and contribute to the understanding and interpretation of taphonomic data.

Along with Boston University, The Taphonomic Research in Anthropology: Centre for Experimental Studies (TRACES) has invited 4 other institutions, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, University of Central Lancaster, U.K., Turkish Police Forensic Laboratory-Ankara Turkey and The Ministry of Justice-Bangkok, Thailand.

The  Forensic Anthropology program at BUSM is designed to train individuals in the theory, practice, and methods of biological and skeletal anthropology employed by forensic anthropologists in medicolegal death investigations. Students receive extensive training in osteology, forensic anthropological techniques and procedures, forensic anthropology field methods, biological anthropology theory, taphonomy, human anatomy, crime scene investigation and methods of human identification. This is a full-time 42 credit Master of Science program. To learn more about this program and others, please visit the Graduate Medical Sciences website.

Congratulations to BMFS student Jennifer Field: Recipient of the Ruth and Martin Levine Scholarship

March 12th, 2013 in BMFS

The Ruth and Martin Levine Scholarship in Graduate Medical Sciences is made possible by the generous donation of Ruth R. Levine, PhD. Dr. Levine was the first Associate Dean of Graduate Medical Sciences and a faculty member at BUSM for many years. Given her own life experiences her wish was to allocate “income to provide annual scholarship awards to one or more graduate students enrolled in the Division of Graduate Medical Sciences, who have demonstrated excellent scholarship. Preference shall be given to female students who have reached their 30th birthday and are returning to academia after an interruption”.