Category: Uncategorized

BUSM Opens New Clerkship Sites in California

February 1st, 2015 in Uncategorized

Boston University School of Medicine has developed an affiliation with Northern California Kaiser Permanente to offer two new clinical clerkship sites for our third-year medical students.

kaiser-permanenteBeginning in May 2015, 12 third-year students will begin their clerkships at Kaiser Permanente Medical Centers in San Jose and Santa Clara. After an orientation with their classmates in Boston, six will stay for a full year, while six will stay for six months. Students will rotate in family medicine, OB/GYN, internal medicine, psychiatry and neurology at the San Jose site and  in pediatrics, surgery, radiology and psychiatry at the Santa Clara site. Although this program is new for BU, Kaiser has a strong and well-established medical education framework that includes students from Stanford, UC-San Francisco, UC-Davis and Drexel.

In addition to an excellent clinical experience, the Kaiser Campus Third-Year Curriculum Program will expose students to Kaiser’s healthcare technology, preventive medicine and progressive healthcare delivery model. Students will participate in quality improvement training programs, master their electronic health system, and develop their own quality improvement projects.

Kaiser has revolutionized health care and health-care technology, providing more immediate and responsive patient care. A leader in patient safety and quality improvement, the Kaiser system has been the model for the future of medicine. Their focus on preventive care and an outpatient-centered care model reduces hospital admissions and testing.

“We are delighted to offer our students the opportunity to work in another innovative and evidenced-based system that is committed to high-value, high-quality medical care,” said Karen Antman, MD, BUSM dean and provost of the BU Medical Campus.

Despite the distance from Boston campus, students will receive uniform didactic instruction. Program Manager Monica Parker-James is coordinating the online educational experiences. Recorded lectures can be reviewed at the student’s convenience. The students also will be able to participate in live small-group discussions and case vignettes with Microsoft Lync access.

Microsoft Lync is a platform for unified communications including online meetings, instant messaging, audio and video calls, availability info and sharing capabilities.

Dr. Harley Goldberg, who has a long history of service in the Kaiser system and is involved in quality evaluations at San Jose, will coordinate the training and supervision of our students in California. He will work with students via video conferencing prior to June and will orient and mentor the students during their time in the Kaiser facilities. He has worked closely with the BUSM Kaiser Committee and clerkship directors to provide a seamless transition for the students.

Assistant Dean Paige Curran in the Office of Student Affairs will monitor student mental and physical health and support academic and career development through online communication and quarterly visits to California.

The BUSM students will have faculty support while in California and many will also be close to family and friends. In addition, we are planning a California BUSM alumni network for additional student support, mentoring and career development. Several alumni have already expressed interest, including Veronica Santini, BUSM class of 2000, an assistant professor of neurology at Stanford.

“We are impressed by how vested our counterparts in California are in making this a successful partnership,” said Anna Hohler, MD, assistant dean of academic affairs at BUSM. “This collaboration is a win-win. Kaiser will work with students who are smart, dedicated and professional. Our students will train in a leading health care system that shares our commitment to high-quality medical education, devotion to diverse patient populations and a vision for excellence in health care. We are thrilled to be able to offer this opportunity to our students.”

New Model Better Predicts Breast Cancer Risk in African American Women

January 30th, 2015 in Uncategorized

Researchers from Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center have developed a breast cancer risk prediction model for African- American women that found greater accuracy in predicting risk for the disease. The use of this model could result in increased eligibility of African Americans in breast cancer prevention trials.

The effectiveness of breast cancer prevention and early detection strategies depends in part on the ability to accurately identify individuals at increased risk of the disease. Models for predicting absolute risk of breast cancer have been used for chemoprevention decision-making and for determining eligibility for recruitment into prevention trials. The well-respected Gail Model has been used widely for breast cancer risk prediction in white women but has been shown to underestimate risk in African-American women. Underestimation of risk for African-American women has contributed to their underrepresentation in breast cancer prevention trials.

Researchers used prospective data from 55,000 African-American women age 30-69 at baseline in the Boston University Black Women’s Health Study to develop a breast cancer risk prediction model specifically for African-American women. It included family history of breast cancer, history of benign breast disease, age at menarche, age at first birth, bilateral oophorectomy, oral contraceptive use, hormone use, body mass index at age 18 and adult height.

Julie Palmer

Julie Palmer

“The model was well calibrated in that it predicted 486 cases in comparison to an observed 506 cases during the additional five years of follow-up,” explained senior author Julie Palmer, senior epidemiologist at Boston University’s Slone Epidemiology Center and professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health. “Based on the Black Women’s Health Study model, 14.6 percent of women age 30-69 were predicted to have a five-year risk of at least 1.66 percent. This is considerably higher than the proportion predicted by previous models to be above that end point,” said Palmer.

According to the researchers previous breast cancer risk prediction models for African-American women have used information on only a few factors and may have underestimated risk. “The new model appears to improve prediction and, if used for determining eligibility for entry into prevention trials, would likely result in a greater number of African-American women invited to enroll in the trials,” she added.

Funding for this study was provided by the Susan G. Komen for the Cure Foundation and the National Cancer Institute.

Football: Child’s Play, Adult Peril?

January 29th, 2015 in Uncategorized

sternBU Today

Robert Stern, PhD, neurology, neurosurgery, CTE Center

Julie Stamm, PhD candidate

As the 100 million viewers tuning in to this Sunday’s Super Bowl can attest, Americans adore football. And for many, the love affair begins in childhood: Pop Warner Tiny-Mites start as young as age five, and many adults retain warm memories and friendships from their youth football days.

But a new study from BU School of Medicine researchers points to a possible increased risk of cognitive impairment from playing youth football.

Experts’ quotes:

“This is one study, with limitations,” adds study senior author Robert Stern, a MED professor of neurology, neurosurgery, and anatomy and neurobiology and director of the Alzheimer’s Disease Center’s Clinical Core. “But the findings support the idea that it may not make sense to allow children—at a time when their brain is rapidly developing—to be exposed to repetitive hits to the head. If larger studies confirm this one, we may need to consider safety changes in youth sports.”

“Sports are important, and we want kids to participate in football,” says Stamm. “But no eight-year-old should play a sport with his friends and end up with long-term problems. We just want kids to play sports more safely.”

Read the full article.

BUSM’s Dr. Kermit Crawford Invokes MLK’s Legacy for Action Today

January 23rd, 2015 in Uncategorized

unnamed-4Boston University School of Medicine, the location of the first medical college to graduate an African-American female physician and the first African-American psychiatrist, holds diversity close to its heart—especially at this time of year.

In memory of BU School of Theology alumnus Martin Luther King, Jr., Kermit Crawford, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry at BUSM and clinical psychologist at Boston Medical Center, shared his thoughts on the significance of Dr. King’s legacy in today’s society.

To a crowded Keefer auditorium Jan. 22, Crawford said he came to talk about one very specific aspect of diversity: race.

“Race is a social construction. Race is something we give meaning to. But that social construct has real world consequences,” Crawford said referencing the recent events in Ferguson, New York, Florida and elsewhere.

Crawford recalled his youth as an African-American boy growing up in North Carolina and the pronounced distinction between black and white. Back then there still were separate bathrooms for blacks and whites, sections in the rear of restaurants for blacks and KKK rallies.

“Dr. Crawford has the luxury of not thinking about that—Kermit did not have that luxury,” he said.

Interspersing his presentation with audio clips from Dr. King’s speeches from the 1960s, Crawford made the point that though we’ve come a long way as a society from the days when black persons counted as three-fourths of a person, there is still a long way to go.

“We can start here, but we’re not able to stay here,” he said citing issues of education, homeownership rates and police brutality.

Crawford called out the names of young black men who were killed by police brutality, including Michael Brown and Trayvon Martin, as their pictures appeared on the screen with text that read, “Unintended but not a mistake.”

Calling on the doctors, nurses, deans and students in the room to use their privileges to do something about the injustices in the world, he said, “Black lives matter, but you know every life matters and we have to assert that reality.”

An audio clip of Dr. King played aloud, “There comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular, but he must take it because conscience tells him it is right.”

unnamed-2“That’s a proper sense of priorities,” Crawford said.

To end the event, Moisès Fernández Viafrom the BUSM Diversity and Multicultural Affairs office and BU Arts Outreach Initiative, accompanied BMC patient Dina Jerome on piano as she sang “Motherless Child,” a song dating back to the time of slavery, which still has significance for injustices in our society today.

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Jan. 26 Exploring the Role of Social and Cultural Determinants Influencing Latino HIV and Substance Abuse Health Disparities

January 16th, 2015 in Uncategorized

BU Medical Campus faculty, residents and PhD students are invited to a colloquium sponsored by the BU School of Social Work. Join Mario De La Rosa, PhD, Professor at Florida International University, Miami as he discusses “Exploring the Role of Social and Cultural Determinants Influencing Latino HIV and Substance Abuse Health Disparities” on Monday, Jan. 26 at 10:45 a.m. Dr. De La Rosa is a candidate for the inaugural Director of the Center for Innovation in Social Work and Health. A luncheon will immediately follow the colloquium, RSVP required by Jan. 22 to pfrasso@bu.edu

  • “Exploring the Role of Social and Cultural Determinants Influencing Latino HIV and Substance Abuse Health Disparities”
  • Mario De La Rosa, PhD, Professor at Florida International University, Miami
  • Colloquium: Monday, Jan. 26, 10:45 a.m.
  • Hiebert Lounge, BUSM Instructional Building
  • Luncheon following colloquium, RSVP required by Jan. 22, pfrasso@bu.edu

 

 

 

Making the Case-The Added Values of Social Work in Health Care and Service Delivery, Jan 12 Colloquium

January 7th, 2015 in Uncategorized

BUMC faculty and PhD students are invited to attend a colloquium presented by Darrel Wheeler, PhD, MSW, MPH, Dean and Professor at Loyola University, Chicago. Dr. Wheeler is a candidate for the inaugural Director of the Center for Innovation in Social Work and Health and he will speak on “Making the Case-The Added Values of Social Work in Health Care & Service Delivery.”

  • Monday, Jan. 12
  • Colloquium: 10:45 a.m.-noon
  • Lunch: noon- 1 p.m
  • Hiebert Lounge, BUSM Instructional Building

BUMC Faculty and PhD students, RSVP to Patty Frasso by Thursday, Jan. 8 pfrasso@bu.edu

 

 

 

Jan. 22 Celebrate the Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., ” The Enduring Legacy and Lessons of MLK: From Birmingham to Ferguson”

January 6th, 2015 in Uncategorized

All members of the BU Medical Campus are invited to a special presentation commemorating the legacy of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Kermit Crawford

Kermit A. Crawford

Kermit A. Crawford, PhD is a forensic psychologist and associate professor of Psychiatry at BU School of Medicine. He is the Executive Director of the Massachusetts Marathon Bombing Victims/Survivors Resiliency Center and the Director of the Center for Multicultural Mental Health, providing leadership across the nation in the aftermath of disasters, ranging from Sept. 11, 2001, to the Boston Marathon bombings.

Crawford has been honored with a doctorate from Boston College, as well as a doctoral degree of humane letters from the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology. He has a variety of peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, and is the recipient of the Commissioner’s Excellence Award, the 2012 Excellence in Diversity Training Award from APPIC, the 2012 American Psychological Association’s Minority Fellowship Program James Jones Lifetime Achievement Award and the 2014 Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services Individual Award. He also has made presentations on culturally competent practices in mental health at several acclaimed national organizations.

Following Dr. Crawford’s presentation, a musical performance sponsored by the Boston University Medical Campus Arts Program, will feature BMC patient Joseph Payne (vocals) and Moisès Fernández Via (piano).

Celebrate the Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

  • Speaker: Kermit A. Crawford, PhD
  • Topic: The Enduring Legacy and Lessons of MLK: From Birmingham to Ferguson
  • Date: Thursday, Jan. 22
  • Time: 12:30-1:30 p.m.
  • Location: Keefer Auditorium

This event is brought to you by BUSM Office of Diversity and Multicultural Affairs in collaboration with BU Goldman School of Dental Medicine Office of Diversity, BU School of Public Health, BMC Human Resources Department and the BMC Minority Recruitment Program.

Dec. 16: The Role of Physicians, Psychologists, and Health Care Providers in Post-9/11 Torture

December 15th, 2014 in Uncategorized

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A Forum on the US Senate’s Committee Study of the CIA Interrogation Program

The release of the Senate’s Report on CIA Post-9/11 Interrogation Methods and Results has created wide-ranging debate on the use of torture, the results of torture (both in terms of intelligence obtained and harm done to the prisoners), and the role of physicians, psychologists and health care providers in the CIA’s torture and interrogation programs. Panelists will address these issues, national and international law on torture, the relevance of the Nuremberg Principles, applicable medical ethics standards regarding the physician’s role in torture and prison medicine, and what health and medical-related obligations, if any, the US owes.

Panelists: Sondra Crosby, MD, Michael Grodin, MD, George Annas, JD
Moderator: Leonard Glantz, JD

When: Tuesday, Dec. 16, 4-5 p.m.
Where:
Bakst Auditorium

Sponsored by the Department of Health Law, Bioethics & Human Rights, BU School of Public Health and Global Lawyers & Physicians.

Boston Medical Center and Tufts Medical Center Eye Partnership

December 11th, 2014 in Uncategorized

Med schools would remain separate, safety-net hospital would stay in place

Boston Medical Center, Boston’s “safety-net hospital” and the primary teaching hospital for the BU School of Medicine, is discussing a strategic partnership, including a potential merger, with Tufts Medical Center, the primary teaching hospital for Tufts University Medical and Dental Schools.

Karen Antman, dean of the School of Medicine and provost of the Medical Campus, stressed that any partnership or merger would not include the medical schools, which are parts of their respective universities.

Robert A. Brown, president of Boston University, says it is imperative that any partnership or merger maintain Boston Medical Center (BMC) as a premier academic medical center and as a safety-net hospital, fulfilling the hospital’s mission to provide exceptional care to the city’s vulnerable populations, regardless of insurance status or ability to pay. “BMC is a superb academic medical center and the city’s most important safety-net hospital,” Brown says. “If a partnership or merger can ensure that BMC continues to play both these roles in a stronger, sustainable way in the future, it is worth pursuing.”

Kate Walsh, president and CEO of Boston Medical Center, echoed Brown’s commitment to continuing to provide first-rate medical care for all. Walsh says conversations to date suggest that a strategic partnership may strengthen the missions of both medical centers and that “an affiliation that secures a long, bright future of continuing to provide exceptional care without exception would be of great interest to us.”

She says a partnership with Tufts Medical Center could have great potential benefits, including new options to serve patients, greater financial resources, and a larger referral network to attract new patients and better payments from insurers.

“Tufts Medical Center is our neighbor,” says Walsh. “We know them, we respect them, we share a common geography and a commitment to providing high-quality care to all patients. We also share a mutual commitment to our academic missions of teaching and research.”

Over the last 20 years, changes in health care models have made hospital partnerships and mergers a virtual requirement for a sustainable health care business, particularly in the Boston area. In 1994, Massachusetts General and Brigham and Women’s teaching hospitals teamed up to form Partners Health Care, which has since brought in several community hospitals around Boston. In a rival venture, Steward Health Care has, in the past few years, taken over 10 community hospitals as well at St. Elizabeth’s and Carney hospitals. Earlier this year, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center took control of Jordan Hospital in Plymouth and formed a joint venture with New England Baptist Hospital. Antman says many observers of Boston’s crowded health care arena consider a merger involving Boston Medical Center to be long overdue.

Similarly, changes in health care payments combined with cuts in research funding have hit academic medical centers particularly hard. An alliance between Tufts and BMC could produce efficiencies of scale, Antman says.

Walsh cautioned that while the two medical centers have much in common, “there is more work we need to do before we will know whether a partnership is the best option for our employees, and most importantly, our patients.”

A combination of the two medical centers could result in significant change for clinical faculty at both schools of medicine. Boston Medical Center currently has 724 physicians, including the clinical faculty at the BU School of Medicine, and Tufts Medical Center employs 500. BMC officials say any partnership involving the two hospitals would take years to accomplish, and that the medical center would continue to offer a full range of services.

“We do not underestimate the anxiety that this will create among our clinical faculty,” Brown says. “We also understand that the hospitals, and not the universities, control the outcome of any discussion. We will do all we can to provide support and advocacy on behalf of our clinical faculty during what will be a period of uncertainty.”

If the two hospitals merge, the two medical schools would remain separate, each with its own faculty, curriculum, and rotations, called clerkships. The merger would have no impact on the number of students enrolled at the BU Medical School or on the size of the medical sciences faculty who teach at the school. However, the consolidation may result in fewer hospital beds, which might reduce the number of clerkships and residency slots available to BU and Tufts Medical students in the consolidated hospital. Currently, 45 percent of BU medical students do their clerkships at BMC while 35 percent of Tufts medical students do theirs at Tufts Medical Center.

Antman says she does not foresee a shortage of clerkship opportunities for BU medical students. “We are affiliated with 20 other hospitals in the area,” she says, “and we have a program in place to identify even more clerkship and residency opportunities in Boston, and around the country.”

With more than 870,000 patient visits last year and more than 4,500 full-time staff, Boston Medical Center is the largest safety-net hospital in New England. Approximately 70 percent of BMC patient visits come from come from people who rely on government payers such as Medicaid, the Health Safety Net, and Medicare for their coverage.

Boston Medical Center struggled with changes to the health care business for years and only recently, under the leadership of CEO Kate Walsh, has it approached financial stability. In 2012, the hospital reversed three years of losses and posted a small but meaningful financial gain. At the same time, Moody’s Investor Service and Standard & Poor’s bumped up their ratings of the hospital from negative to stable.

“Kate Walsh’s excellent track record as our hospital leader gives us added assurance that any change is likely to be in the best interests of the hospital, the underserved, and those medical students and clinical faculty associated with the facility in the future,” Brown says.

Antman says she sees hope in successful mergers such as the 1998 partnership of New York Hospital and the Presbyterian Hospital, which created the 2,500-bed New York Presbyterian Hospital. That hospital, which has two distinct medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and Weill Cornell Medical Center, serves as the primary teaching hospital for Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Weill Cornell Medical College.

“In these initial discussions we are all looking forward to finding a new way to educate medical students in Massachusetts,” says Antman. “There is no reason we can’t work with our partners to create a better educational experience for our students.”

This BU Today story was written by Art Jahnke.

 

Leadership in Healthcare: A Conversation with Former Governor Dukakis

December 4th, 2014 in Uncategorized

The BU Advocacy Training Program presents December Advocacy Grand Rounds, Leadership in Healthcare: A Conversation with Former Governor Michael Dukakis.

michaeldukakisGovernor Dukakis, Massachusetts’ longest serving governor and former Democratic Presidential candidate, has lectured extensively on healthcare policy and reform. Come hear about the changing landscape of healthcare in the US.

Where: BUSM Instructional Building,  L-303

When: Thursday, Dec. 4, 5-6 p.m.

Dinner will be served. Sponsored by the BUSM Alumni Association