News

Are Pediatricians Prepared To Help Patients Who Want IUDs?

By Amy Gorel
February 13th, 2015 in In the Media.

NPR, Shots Blog Mandy Coles, MD, MPH, pediatrics When Wendy Sue Swanson started out as a pediatrician eight years ago, it never crossed her mind to bring up the option of intrauterine devices — an insertable form of long-acting contraception — when she had her regular birth-control discussions with teenage patients who were sexually active. Expert quote: But it's... More

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Why Teen Girls Aren’t Using IUDs

By Amy Gorel
February 13th, 2015 in In the Media.

The Atlantic Mandy Coles, MD, MPH, pediatrics When Wendy Sue Swanson started out as a pediatrician eight years ago, it never crossed her mind to bring up the option of intrauterine devices—an insertable form of long-acting contraception—when she had her regular birth-control discussions with teenage patients who were sexually active. Expert quote: But it’s hard to know when or... More

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Study finds Positive Trends in Medical Genetics Education

By Lisa Brown
February 12th, 2015 in Research.

Today’s physicians require an increasingly comprehensive understanding of the principles of genetics and genomics in order to make informed clinical decisions. Scientific discoveries are bringing genomic technology directly to consumers at an increasingly rapid pace. The availability of genomic information necessitates that educators provide adequate training in genetics and genomics for future health-care providers. In a... More

Head Examiner

By Lisa Brown
February 12th, 2015 in Research, Uncategorized.

MED neurologist on battered brains, tangled tau, and the future of sports Ann McKee, a MED professor of neurology and pathology, studies the long-term effects of repetitive brain injury. “It’s shocking to see neurodegenerative disease in a 25-year-old,” she says. Photo by Vernon Doucette For Ann McKee, every brain tells a story. And sometimes it’s a tragic... More

Mucus Is Gross. But Here Are 9 Things You Should Know About It

By Amy Gorel
February 12th, 2015 in In the Media.

Vox Jeffrey Spiegel, MD, otolaryngology Mucus is not widely considered a topic for polite conversation. It's something to be discreetly blown into a tissue, folded up, and thrown away. But the simple truth is that without mucus, you wouldn't be alive. Expert quote: "Mucus is essential for the protection of your body," says Jeffrey Spiegel, an ear, nose, and throat surgeon... More

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Head Examiner: Neurologist Ann McKee talks about battered brains, tangled tau, and the future of sports

By Amy Gorel
February 12th, 2015 in In the Media.

BU Research Ann McKee, MD, neurology and pathology For Ann McKee, every brain tells a story. And sometimes it’s a tragic one. McKee, a professor of neurology and pathology at the Boston University School of Medicine (MED), is the director of neuropathology for the Veterans Affairs New England Healthcare System, and also directs BU’s Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy... More

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Pass the Salt? MED Researcher Probes Link Between Salt and Hypertension

By Lisa Brown
February 11th, 2015 in Research.

Let’s face it: salt is delicious. Sprinkle it on tomatoes and they pop with flavor; shake it over popcorn and it’s movie time. Even Nelson Mandela noted its worth in his inaugural address: “Let there be work, bread, water, and salt for all,” he said. But when it comes to diet and high blood pressure, salt... More

Students Take Advantage Of Snow Day

By Amy Gorel
February 10th, 2015 in Student Activities.

With the BU Medical Campus closed for the second day this week due to snow and the MBTA shut down, BUSM students took a break from studying to enjoy the snow piling up and play some football.

New Research in Boston Could Change Fight Against Alzheimer’s

By Amy Gorel
February 10th, 2015 in In the Media.

WCVB-5 Robert Stern, PhD, neurology, neurosurgery No new drugs for treatment have been approved by the FDA since 2003, but that could change with research that is underway in Boston. The Boston University Alzheimer's Disease Center and Boston Medical Center are taking part in several trials and studies, including one that brings significant hope. The Noble Study will... More

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IUDs Can Be Practical for Teenagers, but Pediatricians May Lack Training in their Use

By Amy Gorel
February 10th, 2015 in In the Media.

Washington Post Mandy Coles, MD, MPH, pediatrics When Wendy Swanson started out as a pediatrician eight years ago, it never crossed her mind to bring up the option of intrauterine devices — an insertable form of long-acting contraception — when she had her regular birth-control discussions with teenage patients who were sexually active. Expert quote: But it’s hard to... More

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