News

The Invisible War on the Brain

By Amy Gorel
January 23rd, 2015 in In the Media.

National Geographic Lee Goldstein, MD, PhD, psychiatry, neurology, ophthalmology Brain trauma from blast force is the signature injury of the Iraq and Afghanistan campaigns, afflicting hundreds of thousands of U.S. combat personnel. Although unseen, the damage strikes deeply into a soldier’s mind and psyche.   Quote: To test the theory that blast exposure may have triggered CTE pathology, Goldstein’s team... More

Tagged:

BUSM’s Dr. Kermit Crawford Invokes MLK’s Legacy for Action Today

By Amy Gorel
January 23rd, 2015 in Events.

Boston University School of Medicine, the location of the first medical college to graduate an African-American female physician and the first African-American psychiatrist, holds diversity close to its heart—especially at this time of year. In memory of BU School of Theology alumnus Martin Luther King, Jr., Kermit Crawford, PhD, associate professor of psychiatry at BUSM and... More

Tagged:

Jan. 28 Lecture: “Head Games: CTE and the Long-Term Consequences of Repetitive Brain Trauma”

By Amy Gorel
January 22nd, 2015 in Events.

BU School of Medicine faculty member Robert A. Stern, PhD, will present the 2015 Sargent College of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences Dudley Allen Sargent Distinguished Lecture. A professor of neurology, neuosurgery, and anatomy and neurobiology at the School of Medicine, he will speak on "Head Games: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy and the Long-Term Consequences of Repetitive... More

Genetic Variants Underlying Normal Brain Development and Aging ID’d

By Lisa Brown
January 21st, 2015 in Research.

The identification of genetic variants that influence the structure of the brain may provide insight into the causes of variability in human brain development. The findings, which appear this week in the journal Nature, may also help determine the genetic processes that underlie neuropsychiatric diseases. Portions of the human brain known as the subcortical regions are... More

A New Tactic for Fighting Cancer

By Lisa Brown
January 20th, 2015 in Uncategorized.

Deeper understanding of telomeres may lead to targeted cancer treatments By a quirk of biology, every time an adult cell divides, a bit of DNA gets lopped off the end of the double helix. This seems like a recipe for disaster—imagine a crazed librarian ripping the last chapter off a book every time it got checked... More

A New Tactic for Fighting Cancer

By Amy Gorel
January 20th, 2015 in In the Media.

BU Today Rachel Flynn, PhD, pharmacology and experimental therapeutics By a quirk of biology, every time an adult cell divides, a bit of DNA gets lopped off the end of the double helix. This seems like a recipe for disaster—imagine a crazed librarian ripping the last chapter off a book every time it got checked out. Soon, More

Tagged:

Jan. 26 Exploring the Role of Social and Cultural Determinants Influencing Latino HIV and Substance Abuse Health Disparities

By Lisa Brown
January 16th, 2015 in Events.

BU Medical Campus faculty, residents and PhD students are invited to a colloquium sponsored by the BU School of Social Work. Join Mario De La Rosa, PhD, Professor at Florida International University, Miami as he discusses “Exploring the Role of Social and Cultural Determinants Influencing Latino HIV and Substance Abuse Health Disparities” on Monday, Jan. More

10 Questions: Thea James, MD

By Amy Gorel
January 16th, 2015 in In the Media.

Medpage Today Thea James, MD, emergency medicine Thea James, MD, is an associate professor of emergency medicine at Boston Medical Center (BMC)/Boston University School of Medicine, and president of the medical and dental faculty. She is also the co-founder and director of the Violence Intervention Advocacy Program at BMC, which provides victims of violence with services that promote healing and... More

Tagged:

Researchers Find New Links Between Obesity and Cardiovascular Disease

By Lisa Brown
January 15th, 2015 in Research.

Obesity-linked diabetes is a growing public health problem and contributes to cardiovascular disease, the most prevalent cause of death in the U.S. High plasma concentrations fatty acids derived from food intake and excess fat stores and high concentrations of glucose from diet are hallmarks of diabetes. Increasing attention has been directed to fatty acids and... More

Boston Researchers Test Drug That Will Try to Slow Down Alzheimer’s

By Amy Gorel
January 15th, 2015 in In the Media.

Boston Herald Robert Stern, PhD, neurology and neurosurgery Hub researchers are testing a pill that could protect the brain against the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease — a treatment that could be the first to slow the progression of one of the nation’s most common killers, they say.   Expert quote: “It’s the only cause in the United States in the... More

Tagged: